Wednesday, January 27, 2010

Matthew 23:37

O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the city that kills the prophets and stones those who are sent to it! How often would I have gathered your children together as a hen gathers her brood under her wings, and you would not!

This has often been a verse used to argue against a Calvinistic understanding of limited atonement and reprobation. Jesus here seems to be saying that he wanted to gather these men to themselves though they, through their own disobedience, rejected his offer.
Unfortunately, this argument has been weakened by Dave Hunt and the like. Arminians have often misquoted this verse saying, "how often I would have gathered you together". This would change the meaning of the verse so that Jesus is telling those whom he is speaking to that he wanted to gather them together.
However, despite this verse being often misquoted, I still think it can be used to argue for a universal saving will in God. Jesus is here talking to the leaders of Jerusalem rather than Jerusalem itself. He is saying that he wanted to gather the people of Jerusalem together, but their corrupt leaders would not allow him.
James White and others have argued that because Jesus is talking to the leaders rather than the people of Jerusalem themselves, this verse cannot be used to support a universal saving will in God. I, however, disagree. The fact still remains that Christ wept because these people were not saved, and longed for them to be saved. The fact that he is talking to their leaders rather than the people themselves makes no difference.
There is a clear instance in this verse of Christ stating that he longed to save those who were not saved, and even wept at their lack of salvation. Though God has from eternity elected specific men unto salvation, he has a will to truly offer salvation to all.

12 comments:

紅包 said...
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Anonymous said...
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オテモヤン said...
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Turretinfan said...

"The fact still remains that Christ wept because these people were not saved"

It doesn't say in the text that Christ wept, friend!

Resequitur said...

"universal saving will in God. "

"She will bear a son, and you shall call his name Jesus, for He will save his people from their sins."

So do you explain this away with Cosmic Schizophrenia?

Anonymous said...

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And according to this article, I totally agree with your opinion, but only this time! :)

Jordan Cooper said...

TurretinFan, thanks for looking at my blog. I have read and appreciated a lot of your articles on Aomin. You are correct that it does not say Christ wept. It was a poor choice of words. My main point however is the same. The fact is that Christ still is sorrowful in this text over those who were not gathered unto himself.

Resequitur said...

Sorrowful over who? Who he refers to as Jerusalem? Or who He refers to as "their children" ? It is not as though He had failed at gathering who would come to Him, that is not the point in this statement. The point in this statement is that the very city that He ordained to be the holy land, and the very people He appointed to be herding His flock until His coming had barred off the gate, making it all the more difficult to enter (even though the ones who He had called to come to Him did come) {John 6:37}

TimB said...

Luke 19:41 He beheld the city, and wept over it.

Resequitur said...

Thats not in the same context, brother. Luke 11:40-54 is the proper context that corresponds with the anathematization of the Pharisees in Matthew 23.

David Bishop said...

How does "gather your children" translate into gather you, you leaders?