Wednesday, April 3, 2013

Why are some saved and others not?

Here's the program.

Today's program was spent discussing issues in Reformed Theology. I briefly addressed Steve from Triablogue's comments, and then went into a discussion from the program Christ the Center. The Reformed podcast Christ the Center had Dr. Lane Tipton of Westminster Seminary Philadephia to discuss an essay of B.B. Warfield titled the Plan of Salvation.

In this discussion, Tipton made claims about Lutheranism that are inaccurate; he argued that Lutherans believe in conditional election to salvation based on non-resistance to God's grace. I spent the majority of the program demonstrating why this is not true and addressing the question "Why are some saved and others not?"

The essays of Walther I referenced can be found here.

You can listen to the program I responded to here.

7 comments:

Brian Bechtel said...

I suggested a long time ago (while we were still members of a Presbyterian church) that they have you on the podcast to have a cordial discussion with Lane (or others) about such things, but alas, to no avail. I even said you would be an irenic Lutheran interlocutor to have on a Reformed show :-)

Jordan Cooper said...

Did you ever get a response?

J. Dean said...

Good podcast, Jordan. I thought they had Rod Rosenbladt (a Lutheran) on WHI. Isn't he Lutheran?

Jordan Cooper said...

Yes, Rod is a Lutheran, but I wasn't talking about the White Horse Inn. The podcast I was referring to is called Christ the Center. They have had Horton on the program, but not Rod.

David Gray said...

White Horse Inn can be pretty good, having both Lutheran and Reformed hosts tends to keep any description of doctrine reasonably close to reality.

J. Dean said...

Ahhh, gotcha. Sorry. Thought you meant WHI

Nickolas Steffen said...

Jordan, just happened upon your blog and enjoyed listening to your clarifications between the Reformed and Lutheran understandings of election. Lutheranism according to Warfield claims that God's will is descriptive of the elect and that man's will (resistance) is determinative. Your description, as I understand it, reverses these claims so that God's will becomes determinative and man's resistance is descriptive of God's determination. Am I understanding you correctly?